Tim Kaine, VP candidate, on the part his Catholicism plays in his public vocation

Said Senator Tim Kaine in an interview with the National Catholic Reporter, "What I've tried to do is be a religious person and just share who I am with people. Not to proselytize, not to make them be who I am … because if I tell people I like to play the harmonica, and I like to camp, I got three kids, I'm married, why wouldn’t I share what's the most important thing to me?" more »


The Hidden Influence of Clinton and Trump’s Religion

In this election, the country has paid scant attention to the spiritual life of Mr. Trump and Mrs. Clinton, a fact reflected in polls that show how little voters know about their faiths. But religion is central to both of their identities — though in profoundly different ways. more »
Celebrating the Assumption, and it's meaning in a time of modern violence

A visit to Ephesus in Turkey reveals a beautiful, secluded stone house where Mary is thought to have lived out her days -- and where she may have been taken to heaven when her storied life was done. Heavily armed Turkish soldiers guard the entrance, in the wake of the coup there, and in one measure of how violent the world remains two centuries later. more »

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Please Read: US Catholic Bishops' "Faithful Citizenship"

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"He gave us strength in time of trouble, wisdom in time of uncertainty, and sharing in time of happiness. He will always be by our side...[May he] be remembered simply as a good and decent man, who saw wrong and tried to right it, saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it. Those of us who loved him and who take him to his rest today, pray that what he was to us and what he wished for others will some day come to pass for all the world. As he said many times, in many parts of this nation, to those he touched and who sought to touch him:

Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never were and say why not."

Sen Edward M. Kennedy (1932-2009)

Sunday, August 28, 2016

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"Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America: They will be met.

"On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

"On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn-out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics."

Inaugural Address, President Obama


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